Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels

Four children’s book authors support next year's World Albatross Day

The first World Albatross Day is set to be celebrated on 19 June next year following support expressed by ACAP, as it aligns well with the aim of giving the Agreement greater visibility to address the conservation crisis facing albatrosses and petrels (click here).

Over the years, ACAP Latest News has reviewed half a dozen or so illustrated children’s books that have albatrosses as their central theme; all with an important conservation message.  After reaching out to them, four authors have written quotes in support of the inaugural World Albatross Day.  Their quotes follow.

Heidi Auman - Garbage Guts

“The inauguration of World Albatross Day offers me quiet hope that humanity will turn its eyes skyward to these inspiring seabirds and grant them the protections they need."

Maria Gill - Toroa’s Journey

“Whenever I unfold a three-metre wide life-size picture of an albatross schoolchildren gasp and their mouths drop open; they are utterly amazed and have a newfound respect for the albatross.  World Albatross Day is a fantastic way to bring more awareness for the conservation of these magnificent birds.”

Caren Loebel-Fried - A Perfect Day for an Albatross

“The albatross has long been my muse.  Traveller of vast distances on long, thin, glider wings, passionate dancer, exuberant vocalizer, so committed to a mate and a youngster.  I’ve been lucky to know albatrosses, but their lives are mostly hidden from us humans.  Our lack of awareness makes them even more vulnerable than they already are.  World Albatross Day, a yearly celebration of these incredible creatures, brings the albatross into our lives, and knowledge can spark the desire to protect our natural world.”

 

Darcy Pattison - Wisdom the Midway Albatross: Surviving the Japanese Tsunami and other Disasters for over 60 Years

"I first learned about albatrosses after the Japanese tsunami when I wrote Wisdom the Midway Albatross, the story of the oldest known wild bird in the world and how she survived the tsunami.  Her survival for over sixty-five years - in spite of storms, pollution, and questionable fishing practices - continues to surprise and inspire scientists.  Wild creatures such as the Laysan Albatross mean our planet is healthy.  We will happily join with others to celebrate World Albatross Day on 19 June 2020."

With thanks to Heidi Auman, Maria Gill, Caren Loebel-Fried and Darcy Pattison.

John Cooper, ACAP Information Officer, 12 September 2019

Our website is protected by DMC Firewall!