Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels

The National Audubon Society looks forward to celebrating World Albatross Day

 National Audubon Society

The National Audubon Society is the national partner of BirdLife International in the United States.  Founded in 1905, the National Audubon Society protects birds and the places they need, today and tomorrow, throughout the Americas using science, advocacy, education, and on-the-ground conservation. This mission is realized through coordinating the network activities of nearly 500 local chapters and 1.7 million members.

Through its Seabird Restoration Program, Audubon works to reverse the decline of seabird populations caused by the overfishing of prey, climate change and pollution by focusing on sustainable fisheries management, restoring, protecting and creating new seabird sanctuaries and marine protected areas, and by addressing declining populations.

Anna Weinstein Ewan Burns 

Anna Weinstein, Director of Marine Conservation, National Audubon Society; photograph by Ewan Burns

Anna Weinstein, National Audubon Society’s Director of Marine Conservation, writes to ACAP Latest News:

“The National Audubon Society is looking forward to celebrating the very first World Albatross Day this year.  In my home state of California, our members cherish our three species of North Pacific albatrosses which ply our waters from the Aleutian Islands, throughout the U.S. West Coast, and into Baja California.  I am proud of the steps our fisheries managers have taken to reduce the bycatch of albatrosses, cease the use of destructive gear types, and help restore albatross breeding islands.

Now, our nation must join the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels in order to help protect the 31 magnificent species of ACAP-listed albatrosses and petrels around the world.”

With thanks to Rachel Guillory, Communications Manager, Coasts, National Audubon Society.

John Cooper, ACAP Information Officer, 14 June 2020