Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels

Kauaʻi Endangered Seabird Recovery Project to celebrate World Albatross Day next month

KESRP 

The Kauaʻi Endangered Seabird Recovery Project (KESRP) is a State of Hawaii Division of Forestry and Wildlife project, administered through the Pacific Studies Co-operative Unit of the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaiʻi.

Formed in 2006, the project focuses primarily on two Hawaii Islands-endemic seabirds on the island of Kauaʻi – Newell’s Shearwater Puffinus newelli (Critically Endangered) and Hawaiian Petrel Pterodroma sandwichensis (Endangered) – and one native locally threatened species, the Band-rumped Storm Petrel Hydrobates castro (Least Concern).  Work involves identifying the breeding distribution of these rare and enigmatic seabirds, monitoring their breeding colonies, undertaking research projects to understand better their life histories and the various threats they face, and working with partner projects and organizations to ensure their long-term conservation (click here).

ACAP Latest News has regularly reported on KESRP’s activities, including on its innovative approaches to combatting powerline collisions, light pollution, identifying breeding sites via auditory monitoring, monitoring management actions in colonies particularly focused on work against predation by feral cats, feral pigs and rats, and translocating chicks to protected sites (click here).

Andre Raine Newells chick shrunk

André Raine, holds up a Newell’s Shearwater chick

André Raine, KESRP Project Co-ordinator, writes to ACAP Latest News: “On Kaua'i, Laysan Albatrosses [Phoebastria immutabilis] are one of the most immediately familiar and accessible seabirds, with pairs even nesting in residential areas where their elaborate courtship displays captivate everyone who watches them.  This makes them fitting ambassadors for highlighting the conservation challenges of all the seabird species on our island, including the threat of introduced predators such as feral cats, pigs and dogs.  Celebrating World Albatross Day is a great way to pay homage to these magnificent and charismatic seabirds.”

With thanks to Dr André F. Raine, Project Co-ordinator, Kauaʻi Endangered Seabird Recovery Project.

John Cooper, ACAP Information Officer, 27 May 2020